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Showing posts from October 31, 2010

Original Art Stories: Gene Day In His Own Words

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Gene Day is one of those artists that not many people remember much anymore, mainly because he passed away so young, and passed away before the advent of the internet. Now that’s a phrase that’s horrid, but it’s the truth. Artists such as Werner Roth, Dick Dillon and Don Newton fall into the same category, as do quite a number of others, and it’s a shame really as the quality of work produced by a lot of these guys was stellar, and Gene Day was no exception. Born in Canada in 1951, Day passed away in late 1982 of a heart attack in his sleep, at the age of 31.

Day came to prominence with his work for Canadian underground comics and his fanzine illustrations, which showed a depth and talent that, at times, lifted him above the average fanzine artist of the time. After a short stint with Skywald, it didn’t take long for Marvel to reach out for him and he was duly hired to ink Mike Zeck on Master Of Kung Fu, which saw Day following in the footsteps of Paul Gulacy when he took over the…

Original Art Stories: Andru & Esposito's Get Lost

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In 1953 Mike Esposito and Ross Andru sought to retry their hand at publishing once again, this time with MikeRoss Publications. The duo loved writing humor and sketch comedy stories, so they thought this would be a new road for them to travel.

At this point in time the first 3D comics began to appear. The first 3D title was Mighty Mouse, as published by St. John Publishing and drawn by Joe Kubert. Mighty Mouse was no small feat, as it sold over one million copies. With this new wave of comic book style, their distributor asked that the first issue of Get Lost be done in the same 3D format.

Declining to produce Get Lost as a 3D book, the pair quickly produced romance titles in 3D. Bigger companies, such as DC Comics and Timely Comics (the forerunner to Marvel Comics) didn’t touch the 3D look with any large amount of investing. They played the market in a smart manner, whereas the many smaller comic companies saw the 3D look as their big break.

Andru/Esposito then took inspiration fo…